Garlic Harvested in late June, 2012

I harvested my garlic this week.  Mrs. Jimmy helped me get these 100 bulbs out of the ground.

After a little online research, I have discovered that the variety is named “Chamisal Wild.”  It was found by Kristen Davenport Katz from Boxcar Farm near Santa Fe, New Mexico.  After describing it to Kristen, she told me about the recent history of this purple-stripe hardneck:

It was named by us… and the story goes that the postmistress in our small village of Chamisal, NM, told us to go look by the little ditch that ran through the village. The village has been settled since the 1600s by the Spanish, a small Northern New Mexico mountain town. So the postmistress, Noami, told us where to go look because she knew we grew a lot of garlic. So one afternoon in early spring we went wandering down by this creek near an old adobe (hardly anything left of it, really) and I was walking around thinking, gosh, there’s no garlic here … then the scent hit me in the nose and I realized I was walking through a FIELD of garlic that looked like a thick-bladed grass. We went back in August after the bulbils were set and harvested below-ground bulbs and planted it… within 3 years the bulbs were as big as fists. Plus, it tastes great. I think this was 2004. So we’ve been growing it eight years now. Glad you enjoy the garlic, it has spread wide because it’s such a lovely variety.

Many of these garlic bulbs are in the 2 1/2 inch range. A few are 3 inches across. The ones that I left the scapes on are only 1 to 1 1/2 inches in size.  That does seem to matter.

For now, the garlic is resting on my back porch picnic table.  This weekend I will have to get it hanging up in the garage to cure for a few weeks. The garlic is done curing when you can cut the bulbs from the stems and there is no moisture, no juice dripping.

The biggest of them all will become my seed garlic. I’ll plant next year’s crop in a few months.

About these ads

27 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Mason on June 22, 2012 at 7:46 am

    What a nice harvest! I am living vicariously through your garden – and learning a lot from your blog to use when I actually have the space for a garden, so thanks for sharing.

    Reply

    • I am very pleased with this harvest. It’s actually going to end up being more than we need, unless I dehydrate some. I appreciate your compliment. I find myself living vicariously through folks with little farms!

      Reply

  2. Garlic = yum! Great harvest!

    Reply

  3. That is a real nice harvest of garlic. Your garden seem to be thriving. Your tomatoes look good. I agree, I would rather have a nice amount of tomatoes on a plant rather than one large one.

    Reply

  4. I’m so jealous! I love fresh garlic. I will definitely have to try growing some myself one of these days.

    Reply

  5. Really great harvest! Does that come with Listerine? :) We love garlic, makes food taste like it should. Keeps the mosquitoes away as well.

    Reply

  6. Mother-of-all-garlic-load! Great to see it being done in a raised bed the same size (4×8) as mine. My back yard is so shady, maybe 3-4 hours of full sun. I’ve always wanted to try growing garlic. You think that’s enough sun? Thoughts?

    Reply

  7. I will have about 10 garlic plants compared to your 100, but it should be enough for me. I’m not too familiar with growing it so reading your post is helpful – and what a cool story about where it came from. Maybe I will try growing that type if I can find it. Great blog – I will follow.

    Reply

    • Welcome Dusty! I grew a smaller amount of garlic last year, but I enjoyed it so much that I grew a whole lot this year. You might follow the link to the Boxcar Farm in the article above and see if they mail out seed.

      Reply

  8. Posted by thebeadden on June 24, 2012 at 11:55 am

    What an interesting story! Holy garlic, batman! ;)

    Reply

  9. I really want to learn to grow garlic. I think I’m intimidated by the storage of them. I’m gonna plant some this fall hopefully and see what I get.

    Reply

  10. I’m envious.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: