Garlic Chives

My wife is going to have a 14 by 2 foot herb bed near our back door. These garlic chives are one of many things she will have growing there this summer.  They already smell GREAT.

About these ads

4 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Roseanne on March 23, 2010 at 9:50 pm

    I wish I lived in 5B instead of 5A. I have lots of seeds to start, but I’m waiting for about 6 weeks before the predicted last frost before starting them. I only want to transplant once to the outside, skipping transplantation to some interum container. (Lazy, I know, but that’s me.)BTW, 2″ of snow on the first day of spring is just plain obscene. Good thing it was all gone by Monday. Also, if I recall correctly, the squirrels went for the chives first last year.

    Reply

    • Your last frost date should be anywhere between April 21st and the 28th. I would think you could start most seeds now and have them in the ground within 5 weeks.

      Reply

      • Posted by Roseanne on March 24, 2010 at 5:41 pm

        Usually we still get some frost in May, sometimes even as late as the 3rd week. But i think my bigger problem will be the “monsoons” again this year. We never worked so hard to have our yard look so bad as it did last year. My daffodils were open when I got home from work tonight. So at least that put a smile on my face.

        Reply

  2. http://cdo.ncdc.noaa.gov/climatenormals/clim20supp1/states/IL.pdf

    That Illinois chart should give you lots more information. Choose a city near yours and you’ll see the dates where you’re 90% likely to get another frost, 50% likely, and 10% likely.

    When the 90% date arrives I feel comfortable planting out hardened off cold tolerant plants such as lettuce, broccoli, kale, radish and carrot seeds, pea seeds, etc. I usually get all that finished by the 50% date two weeks later.

    I usually baby my tomatoes along as long as I can in their pots and they end up being planted out as stout 18 inch tall plants somewhere between the 50% and 10% likely frost dates. If I have to throw a sheet over them for cold cover for a night or two it’s no big deal.

    I always wait until after the 10% frost date before I direct-seed the warmer crops such as cucumber seeds, watermelon, pumpkin, gourd and similar.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: